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CoE sponsored Techsploration team from Dr. J.H. Gillis Regional High School deliver their presentation about industrial electricians.

Program Year Complete

The program year is complete: 50 events at 24 schools that reached nearly 3000 students—245 of whom are confident young women who can now call themselves Techsploration Alumnae.

The final Techsplorer Event of the program year wrapped up on May 17. Throughout these events there were close to 100 inspiring role models and speakers who shared their insight about career options and life paths. Two pieces of advice were consistently given: first, choose a career that makes you happy; and second, it’s ok to change your mind.

Liz Cummings, an electrician at Irving Shipbuilding Incorporated, relayed both of these messages in her banquet speech at the Saint Mary’s University Techsplorer Event on May 8.

“I think I’d like to start tonight with these simple words: be happy. Most people try to achieve this on a daily basis, but you’d be surprised how many people overlook this when dealing with their career. If you choose correctly, and follow your heart, you’ll never go wrong,” Liz said. “Attitudes can choke, or attitudes can conquer. Happiness is a cultivator of positive attitudes.”

During her speech, Liz went on to explain that she is currently completing her apprenticeship as an industrial electrician—her fourth trade. Previously a press operator, a pre-press technician and a construction electrician, she says that if after she has completed her current apprenticeship and decides to continue her education, she will. People constantly change as their experiences shape their interests and opinions—career trajectories shift or change altogether, and that’s ok. Taking advantage of opportunities that present themselves throughout life leads to unexpected places, worthwhile lessons and personal growth.

This year’s Techsplorer Events at the NSCC Strait Area Campus, Truro Campus and Saint Mary’s University not only introduced young women to careers they may not otherwise have heard of, but built confidence by creating relationships and improving skills in teamwork, public speaking, and report writing. Young women also realized the importance of math and science in their future careers by seeing its relevance in everyday life.

Techsploration’s program partners (NS Department of Labour and Advanced Education-Apprenticeship Training Division, Nova Scotia Community College, and Women in Trades and Technology Nova Scotia) and 38 sponsors make this program possible. Their ongoing support and an excellent network of committed volunteers help our programming flourish year after year. The Techsploration Board of Directors and staff extend our thanks for providing the means to operate such a successful program that has impacted the lives of thousands of young women and their communities throughout Nova Scotia for nearly 15 years.